Home

Teil 2 der Arbeit „The Debate about Racism within Children’s Books – Racist Elements within the Trilogy of Pippi Langstrumpf and White Strategies to Ignore Black/PoC Voices“. Hier geht es zum ersten Teil.

White Strategies to Ignore Black / PoC Voices

May Ayim is one of the Black / PoC voices that have been arguing for centuries against rac­ism in Germany. As mentioned in the introduction the debate about racism within German children’s books, which is part of the debate about everyday racism, is not new. On the con­trary, Black people and People of Colour have been writing, speaking, per­forming, painting and singing for centuries about and against racism.[1] At a panel discus­sion about institutional racism within the Humboldt University Grada Kilomba said recently: „It is not about knowledge, it is about responsibility and decisions.“[2] The knowledge has been provided by Black people – but it is the responsibility of white people to acknowledge it as knowledge and act responsibly.

Obviously, the main stream media decided not to acknowledge this knowledge and not to let Black / PoC voices speak. Nevertheless, they were speaking loudly and in large numbers, but were (mostly) denied the place of privilege in the mainstream media.[3] The two recent articles in the newspaper Die Zeit are only two examples of many arti­cles, which made this too obvi­ous. In the following section I want to investigate the white strategies within these articles that ignore Black / PoC voices.

Keeping the Power of Definition

One of the reasons why the storm of indignation broke loose in the media is the white fear of losing the power to define the „Other“. One could see this fear by the numerous N-words re­cently printed in various newspapers and also on the front-page of the issue in question.

Ulrich Greiner, who wrote the main article, is using the written-out N-word more than a dozen times and without quotation marks. When he investigates the word he comes to the conclusion that it was formerly degrading, but totally unproblematic today and that he is therefore al­lowed to use it.[4] The question on allowance is also expressed through the assertion that delet­ing the N-word out of children’s books is censorship[5] which he compares to Georg Orwell’s dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four[6].

As I wrote above the N-word is a racializing and racial term that derived (among many oth­ers) during the time of European colonialism and imperialism to justify the crimes committed against millions of Africans. Thus it is a word that emerged to define the Black subject as inferior to the white subject. It is important to repeat this because it means that holding on the use of this word means holding onto the racial perception of the Black subject as inferior. To quote Eleonore Wiedenroth-Coulibaly here:

Wer also an kolonial-rassistischer Sprache festhält, hält insgesamt an eben diesen Strukturen fest und klammert sich an hiermit verbundene (Schein-)Privilegien. Das Privileg der Definitionsmacht, nicht nur über sich selbst, sondern vor allem über andere, wird genauso heftig verteidigt wie das Privileg auf Arbeit, Wohnung, geschichtliche Verankerung, Aufenthalt, Familie, Repräsentanz und vieles mehr.[7]

To defend the white power of definition Greiner goes so far as to speak about censor­ship and dictatorship, as if the German state would illegalize the usage of the N-word.

Eleonore Wiedenroth-Coulibaly is with May Ayim one of the authors who wrote the book Farbe bekennen. Afro-deutsche Frauen auf den Spuren ihrer Geschichte[8] from the 1980s. One of the aims of this book was to define oneself:

Mit Audre Lorde entwickelten wir den Begriff „afro-deutsch“ […]. […] [Wir] wollen […] „afro-deutsch“ den herkömmlichen Behelfsbezeichnungen wie „Mischling“, „Mulatte“ oder „Farbige“ entgegensetzen, als einen Versuch, uns selbst zu bestimmen, statt bestimmt zu werden.[9]

To come back to what I said before the knowledge is there but it is the responsibility of the white subject to take it.

Ignoring one’s own History

The holding onto colonial-racist words goes hand in hand with ignorance towards one’s own history. As I already made clear the N-word cannot be detached from its violent historical background. But neither Greiner nor Hacke, who are both white Germans, mention the German colonial history when they write about the debate about the N-word in children’s books. Blanking out this crucial part of the German history serves to preserve the white German as „good“, „rational“ and „reflected“.

Sally Mc Grane from The New Yorker writes: „[I]n a country with such a weighty his­tory of racism and of atonement for its past, the decision [to delete the N-word out of a children’s book] has touched a nerve.“[10] Greiner’s and Hacke’s nerves are obviously being touched, but instead of listening to Mekonnen Mesghena and all the other Black / PoC voices they con­sciously decide not to listen and ignore their own history.

Trivializing Racism

Another very common white strategy is the trivialization of racism. The feelings of Black people / PoC are labelled as „over sensible“ because the white subject can really not see where the problem is. Greiner for example names racist words like the N-word and the Z-word „Formulierungen, die als verletzend empfunden werden könnten“[11], as if Black People and People of Colour had the freedom to choose if they feel hurt by racism or not. Likewise Hacke is complaining about not receiving calmly argued, but highly emotional, angry letters about the N-word in the title of his book.[12]

Furthermore Greiner argues that racism is funny when he compares a scene in the book Jim Knopf und Lukas der Lokomotivführer[13] and comes to the result that the joke of the scene would vanish if one deleted the N-word. In addition he denotes Mesghenas argu­ment that racism within children’s books could harm the children, as being „naïve“[14] and labels the con­struction of the Black „Other“ in Pippi Langstrumpf as „haltlos-unschuldige Spielerei mit jenem Phantasma des naiven Naturvolks, das schon Gauguin umgetrieben hat.“[15] Leaving aside that Paul Gaugin also reproduced racist stereotypes Greiner indicates here that racism would be like an innocent game.

Combined with trivialization a false definition of racism is the result of the argument. Greiner as well as Hacke think that racism is something that one has to do intentional and that can be found only at the extreme right side. It is, as Simone Dede Ayivi writes, as if the group of white people developed their own definition of racism.[16] Hacke for instance cannot under­stand why someone would find the cover of his book, which shows a colonial stereotype of an African with thick lips and wearing only a grass skirt and a bone in his hair, racist:

Und das Bild meines Freundes Sowa stellt doch keinen Menschen dar, auch nicht als Karikatur! Sondern eine surreal-poetische Figur, die so ratlos-selbstbewusst wie mondlichtübergossen auf einer Wiese steht, einen „weißen N*“ von großer Freundlichkeit.[17]

Proving again his denial to accept the colonial tradition behind these stereotypes Hacke ex­presses his false belief that if the stereotyped figure is „friendly“ it cannot be racist. As Fanon writes the absence of will can even be more violating than a racist violation with intention: „[W]e’ll be told, there is no intention to willfully give offense. OK, but it is precisely this ab­sence of will – this offhand manner; this casualness; and the ease with which they classify him, imprison him at an uncivilized and primitive level ‑ that is in­sulting.“[18]

The idea that racism is only violence of right-wing extremists is expressed by Greiner, who sneers at the idea that the N-word in children’s books would produce cruel thugs. Moreover he mocks the statement of Wolfgang Benz that the Pippi Langstrumpf books are full with colonial racism: „Selbstverständlich ist es die Aufgabe eines Rassismus­forschers, Rassismus ausfindig zu machen, aber er sollte sein Augenmerk vielleicht lie­ber auf die Realität richten als auf die Fiktion.“[19] This idea misses the point that right-wing extremism is, as Susan Arndt writes, only the peak of the racist iceberg.[20] To understand racism one has to include „all vocabulary, discourses, images, gestures, ac­tions and gazes“[21] that reproduce the racial percep­tion of the white as superior and the Black as inferior.

Inverting the Roles

Another white ego defence mechanism that serves the self-integrity is the inversion of roles. Greiner and Hacke put themselves in the position of the victim when they speak about censor­ship, proscriptions, and unjustified accusations.[22] The subtitle of Hacke‘s article „Wie ich ein harmloses Buch schrieb – und plötzlich als Rassist beschimpft wurde“ illustrates this once more. As Grada Kilomba states, this defence mechanism is a process of denial[23]:

„We are taking what is Theirs“ becomes „They are taking what is Ours.“ […] It is this moment of asserting onto the other what the subject refuses to recognize in her / himself that characterizes the ego defence mechanism. […] In other words, the oppressor becomes the oppressed, and the op­pressed, the tyrant.[24]

Through this process of denial Mekonnen Mesghena and his allies become the oppres­sor and the white German reader of Pippi Langstrumpf the oppressed whose childhood is threatened to be taken away and who is forbidden to say and write the N-word.

Together with the inversion of roles comes the false assumption that using a racist word or writing a text with racist content does not mean one is an „active racist“:

Allerdings geschieht es häufig, dass die Aussage „diese Bezeichnung kann als rassistisch eingeord­net wer­den“ umgedeutet wird in, „ich werde als Rassist benannt“. Es wird nicht getrennt zwischen der Kritik an Handlungen und an der ganzen Person. Diese Behauptung (und vielleicht auch das ei­gene Erleben) als  ganze Person angegriffen, ist real ein Abwehrmechanismus, um sich nicht differenziert mit dem Vorwurf bzw. der beschriebenen Fragestellung auseinanderzusetzen.[25]

Conclusion

To conclude this paper I want to state it is important that the debate about racism reached the mainstream media and I support the decision of the Thienemann Verlag together with Otfried Preussler to delete racist words out of the mentioned children’s books.

But as the analysis of the Pippi Langstrumpf trilogy has shown it is not enough to delete the N-word, eventually replace it by other racist words and leave the content of the book un­touched. That the Oetinger Verlag already deleted whole scenes with racist contents out of the latest issue of Pippi Langstrumpf fährt nach Taka-Tuka-Land can be seen as a positive exam­ple for the revised issues of Pippi Langstrumpf and other children’s books.

Secondly I think that the way the debate was led shows that this change of mind did not yet reach the white German public. Children’s books are only one part of society and deleting racist words out of children’s books is therefore only one step towards a society where Black People and People of Colour are not confronted with racism every day. As the analysis of the two recent articles of Die Zeit has shown there is a big need for an account of the German colonial past and an acknowledgement that racism in Germany exists.

A first step towards it is to give Black People and People of Colour the public space to speak and allow the white self to listen.

 

Bibliography

Literature

Arndt, Susan. 2006. „Vorwort zur Studienausgabe.“ In AfrikaBilder: Studien zu Rassismus in Deutschland. Edited by Susan Arndt, 5–8. Münster: Unrast.

———. 2011a. „‚Neger_in‘.“ In Wie Rassismus aus Wörtern spricht: (K)Erben des Kolonialismus im Wissensarchiv deutscher Sprache: ein kritisches Nachschlagewerk. Edited by Nadja Ofuatey-Alazard and Susan Arndt, 653–57. Münster: Unrast.

———. 2011b. „Hautfarbe.“ In Wie Rassismus aus Wörtern spricht: (K)Erben des Kolonialismus im Wissensarchiv deutscher Sprache: ein kritisches Nachschlagewerk. Edited by Nadja Ofuatey-Alazard and Susan Arndt, 332–342. Münster: Unrast.

Attikpoe, Kodjo. 2003. Von der Stereotypisierung zur Wahrnehmung des „Anderen“: Zum Bild der Schwarzafrikaner in neueren deutschsprachigen Kinder- und Jugendbüchern (1980-1999). Frankfurt am Main; New York: Peter Lang.

Ayim, May. 2002 [1997]. Grenzenlos und unverschämt. Frankfurt am Main: Fischer.

———. 2005 [1995]. Blues in schwarz weiss: Gedichte. Berlin: Orlanda Frauenverlag.

———. 2006 [1986]. „Rassismus, Sexismus und vorkoloniales Afrikabild in Deutschland.“ In Farbe bekennen: Afro-deutsche Frauen auf den Spuren ihrer Geschichte. Edited by Katharina Oguntoye, May Ayim, and Dagmar Schultz. Berlin: Orlanda Frauenverlag, 25–72.

Ayivi, Simone Dede. 2013. „Koloniale Altlasten: Rassismus in Kinderbüchern: Wörter sind wie Waffen.“ Der Tagesspiegel, January 18. http://www.tagesspiegel.de/kultur/koloniale-altlasten-rassismus-in-kinderbuechern-woerter-sind-waffen/7654752.html (07.03.2013).

Bach, Tina, Josephine Jackson,  Adetoun Küppers-Adebisi, Michael Küppers-Adebisi, Claus Melter, and Farah Melter. „Kinderbuchdebatte – Das N-Wort – Gegen Rassismus in Medien und in Kinderbüchern und Jugendbüchern – Ein offener Brief.“ afrotak. http://afrotak.wordpress.com/2013/01/28/kinderbuchdebatte-das-n-wort-gegen-rassismus-in-medien-und-in-kinderbuchern-und-jugendbuchern-ein-offener-brief/#more-1668 (07.0.2013).

Bechhaus-Gerst, Marianne, ed. 2006. Koloniale und postkoloniale Konstruktionen von Afrika und Menschen afrikanischer Herkunft in der deutschen Alltagskultur. Frankfurt am Main; New York: Peter Lang.

Benz, Wolfgang, ed. 2010. Vorurteile in der Kinder- und Jugendliteratur. Berlin: Metropol-Verlag.

Der braune Mob. 2011. „Warum nicht ‚Neger‘? Informationen für Redaktionen und Journalismus.“ http://www.derbraunemob.info/shared/download/warum_nicht.pdf (07.03.2013).

Eggers, Maureen Maisha. n.d. „Pippi Langstrumpf – Emanzipation nur für weiße Kinder? Rassismus und an (weiße) Kinder adressierte Hierarchiebotschaften.“ http://www.kinderwelten.net/pdf/tagung/Pippi_Langstrumpf-Emanzipation_nur_fuer_weisse_Kinder.pdf (07.03.2013).

———. 2005a. „Rassifizierung und kindliches Machtempfinden: Wie schwarze und weiße Kinder rassifizierte Machtdifferenz verhandeln auf der Ebene von Identität.“ Dissertation, Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel. http://d-nb.info/1019667087/34 (07.03.2013).

———. 2006. „Die Auswirkung rassifizierter (post-)kolonialer Figurationen auf die sozialen Identiäten von weißen und schwarzen Kindern in Deutschland.“ In Koloniale und postkoloniale Konstruktionen von Afrika und Menschen afrikanischer Herkunft in der deutschen Alltagskultur. Edited by Marianne Bechhaus-Gerst. Frankfurt am Main; New York: Peter Lang, 383–94.

Ende, Michael. 1960. Knopf und Lukas der Lokomotivführer. Stuttgart: Thienemann Verlag.

Fanon, Frantz. 2008 [1952]. Black skin, white masks. New York: Grove Press.

fuckermothers. 2013. „Rassismus raus aus Kinderbüchern.“ http://fuckermothers.wordpress.com/2013/01/13/rassismus-raus-aus-kinderbuchern/ (07.03.2013).

Gerloff, Anneke. 2013. „Über den Artikel ‚Die kleine Hexenjagd‘ von Ulrich Greiner in der aktuellen ‚Zeit‘.“ January 21. http://buehnenwatch.com/uber-den-artikel-die-kleine-hexenjagd-von-ulrich-greiner-in-der-aktuellen-zeit/ (07.03.2013).

Greiner, Ulrich. 2013. „Die kleine Hexenjagd.“ Die Zeit, January 17. 4.

Ha, Noa. 2013. „Der Mutmacher.“ http://www.facebook.com/notes/freitext-magazin/der-mutmacher/2732030036780 (07.03.2013).

Hà, Kiên Nghi, ed. 2007. Re-, Visionen: Postkoloniale Perspektiven von People of Color auf Rassismus, Kulturpolitik und Widerstand in Deutschland. 1st ed. Münster: Unrast.

———. 2010. „People of Colour.“ In Rassismus auf gut Deutsch: Ein kritisches Nachschlagewerk zu rassistischen Sprachhandlungen. Edited by Adibeli Nduka-Agwu and Antje Lann Hornscheidt. Frankfurt am Main: Brandes & Apsel, 80-84.

Hacke, Axel. 2013. „Wumbabas Vermächtnis: Wie ich ein harmloses Buch schriebe – und plötzlich als Rassist beschimpft wurde.“ Die Zeit, January 17. 4.

Halser, Marlene. 2011. „Rassismus in Kinderbüchern: Igel bratende Zigeuner.“ February 24. http://www.taz.de/!66388/ (07.03.2013).

Haruna, Hadija. 2013. „Rassismus-Debatte: Wer ist hier empfindlich?“ January 22. http://mediendienst-integration.de/artikel/wer-ist-hier-empfindlich.html (07.03.2013).

Hübert, Henning. 2011. „Südseekönig statt Negerkönig: Wie aus Pippi Langstrumpf eine Rassistin wird.“ http://www.dradio.de/dlf/sendungen/dlfmagazin/1403418 / (07.03.2013).

Johann, Claudia. 2010. „Zigeuner.“ In Rassismus auf gut Deutsch: Ein kritisches Nachschlagewerk zu rassistischen Sprachhandlungen. Edited by Adibeli Nduka-Agwu and Antje Lann Hornscheidt. Frankfurt am Main: Brandes & Apsel, 214–19.

Kelly, Natasha A. 2010. „Das N-Wort.“ In Rassismus auf gut Deutsch: Ein kritisches Nachschlagewerk zu rassistischen Sprachhandlungen. Edited by Adibeli Nduka-Agwu and Antje Lann Hornscheidt. Frankfurt am Main: Brandes & Apsel, 157–66.

Kilomba, Grada. 2008. Plantation memories: Episodes of everyday racism. Münster: Unrast.

———. 2009. „Das N-Wort.“ http://www.bpb.de/gesellschaft/migration/afrikanische-diaspora/59448/das-n-wort (07.03.2013).

Kömürcü Nobrega, Onur S., and Anna Boucher. 2013. „Ein offener Brief an die ZEIT.“ http://maedchenmannschaft.net/nach-dem-sturm-migrationsforscher_innen-bieten-eine-andere-perspektive-auf-die-n-wort-debatte-in-der-zeit/ (07.03.2013).

Lindgren, Astrid. 1971. Pippi in Taka-Tuka-Land. Hamburg: Friedrich Oetinger.

———. 1972. Pippi Langstrumpf. Hamburg: Friedrich Oetinger.

———. 1975. Pippi Langstrumpf geht an Bord. Hamburg: Friedrich Oetinger.

———. 1986. Pippi Langstrumpf. Hamburg: Friedrich Oetinger.

———. 2010a. Pippi Langstrumpf. Hamburg: Friedrich Oetinger.

———. 2010b. Pippi Langstrumpf geht an Bord. Hamburg: Friedrich Oetinger.

———. 2011. Pippi fährt nach Taka-Tuka-Land. Hamburg: Friedrich Oetinger.

McGrane, Sally. 2013. „A Fight in Germany Over Racist Language.“ The New Yorker, January 31. http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2013/01/a-fight-in-germany-over-racist-language.html (07.03.2013).

Mesghena, Mekonnen. 2013. „Neger war immer beleidigend.“ Rheinlandpfalz am Sonntag, January 13.

Mohamed, Sabine. 2012. „Das Wort, das wir nicht aussprechen dürfen.“ June 12. http://www.publikative.org/2012/06/12/das-wort-das-wir-nicht-aussprechen-durfen/ (07.03.2013).

Nduka-Agwu, Adibeli, and Antje-Lann Hornscheidt, eds. 2010. Rassismus auf gut Deutsch: Ein kritisches Nachschlagewerk zu rassistischen Sprachhandlungen. Frankfurt am Main: Brandes & Apsel.

Nduka-Agwu, Adibeli and Wendy Sutherland. 2010. „Schwarze, Schwarze Deutsche.“ In Rassismus auf gut Deutsch: Ein kritisches Nachschlagewerk zu rassistischen Sprachhandlungen. Frankfurt am Main: Brandes & Apsel, 85-90.

Neufeld, Dialika. 2013. „Take Out the N-Word: It’s Time to Remove Racism from Children’s Books.“ Spiegel Online, January 25. http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/why-racism-should-be-removed-from-books-for-children-a-879628.html (07.03.2013).

Oetinger Verlag. 2009. „Die Begriffe ‚Neger‘ und ‚Zigeuner‘ im Werk Astrid Lindgrens.“ http://www.oetinger.de/verlag/haeufige-fragen/neger-und-zigeuner.html (07.03.2013).

Ofuatey-Alazard, Nadja and Susan Arndt, eds. 2011. Wie Rassismus aus Wörtern spricht: (K)Erben des Kolonialismus im Wissensarchiv deutscher Sprache: ein kritisches Nachschlagewerk. Münster: Unrast.

Ofuatey-Alazard, Nadja. 2011. „Eingeborene_r.“ In Wie Rassismus aus Wörtern spricht: (K)Erben des Kolonialismus im Wissensarchiv deutscher Sprache: ein kritisches Nachschlagewerk. Edited by Nadja Ofuatey-Alazard and Susan Arndt. Münster: Unrast, 683.

Oguntoye, Katharina, May Ayim, and Dagmar Schultz, eds. 2006 [1986]. Farbe bekennen: Afro-deutsche Frauen auf den Spuren ihrer Geschichte. Berlin: Orlanda Frauenverlag.

Orwell, George. 1949. Nineteen Eighty-Four. London: Secker and Warburg.

Preussler, Otfried. 1972 [1957]. Die kleine Hexe. Stuttgart: Thienemann Verlag.

Randjelovic, Isidora. 2011. „Zigeuner_in.“ In Wie Rassismus aus Wörtern spricht: (K)Erben des Kolonialismus im Wissensarchiv deutscher Sprache: ein kritisches Nachschlagewerk. Edited by Nadja Ofuatey-Alazard and Susan Arndt. Münster: Unrast, 671–77.

Sabine. 2013. „Political Correctness: Flauschauers Trottelargumentation.“ http://maedchenmannschaft.net/political-correctness-fleischhauers-trottelargumentation/ (08.03.2013).

Shehadistan. 2013. „Toastbrot, Toastbrog. Und über Kinderbücher, Freundschaft und Rassismus.“ http://shehadistan.wordpress.com/2013/01/14/toastbrot-toastbrot-und-uber-kinderbucher-freundschaft-und-rassismus/ (07.03.2013).

Sow, Noah. 2011. „weiß.“ In Wie Rassismus aus Wörtern spricht: (K)Erben des Kolonialismus im Wissensarchiv deutscher Sprache: ein kritisches Nachschlagewerk. Edited by Nadja Ofuatey-Alazard and Susan Arndt. Münster: Unrast, 190-191.

———. 2013. „Zur aktuellen N-Wort Debatte: Stimmen der Vernunft…“. http://www.noahsow.de/blog/2013/01/19/zur-aktuellen-n-wort-debatte-stimmen-der-vernunft/ (07.03.2012).

Sula. 2013. „Hamsterrad der Ignoranz: Wenn Weiße mit sich selber über Rassismus reden.“ http://maedchenmannschaft.net/hamsterrad-der-ignoranz-wenn-weisse-mit-sich-selber-ueber-rassismus-reden/ (07.03.2012).

Surmatz, Astrid. 2005. Pippi Långstrump als Paradigma: Die deutsche Rezeption Astrid Lindgrens und ihr internationaler Kontext. Tübingen: A. Francke.

Thienemann Verlag. 2013. „Erklärung zur Modernisierung von ‚Die kleine Hexe‘.“ http://cms.thienemann.de/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=632%3Aerklaerung-zur-modernisierung&catid=15%3Anews-artikel&Itemid=29 (07.03.2012)..

Wiedenroth-Coulibaly, Eleonore. 2007. Zwanzig Jahre Schwarzer Widerstand in bewegten Räumen: Was sich im Kleinen abspielt und aus dem Verborgenen erwächst.“ In Re-, Visionen: Postkoloniale Perspektiven von People of Color auf Rassismus, Kulturpolitik und Widerstand in Deutschland. Edited by Kiên N. Hà. Münster: Unrast, 401-423.

Wollrad, Eske. 2010. „Kolonialrassistische Stereotype und Weiße Dominanz in der Pippi-Langstrumpf-Triologie.“ In Vorurteile in der Kinder- und Jugendliteratur. Edited by Wolfgang Benz Berlin: Metropol-Verlag, 63–77.

———. 2012. Das Gift der frühen Jahre: Rassismus und Weiße Dominanz in Kinderbüchern. Münster: Unrast.

 

Websites

http://www.afrotak.wordpress.com/

http://www.bpb.de/

http://buehnenwatch.com/

http://cms.thienemann.de/index.php?section=1

http://www.dradio.de/

http://www.facebook.com

http://fuckermothers.wordpress.com/

http://maedchenmannschaft.net/

http://mediendienst-integration.de/

http://www.newyorker.com

http://www.noahsow.de/

http://www.publikative.org/

http://shehadistan.com/

http://www.spiegel.de

http://www.tagesspiegel.de

http://www.taz.de

http://www.oetinger.de


[1]    See also the article of Sula 2013.

[2]    Seminar „Rassismus im deutschen Bildungssystem“, 2./3. März 2013, Auditorium des Jacob & Wilhelm-Grimm-Zentrum der Humboldt University in Berlin.

[3]    See for example Bach u.a. 2013, fuckermothers 2013, Gerloff 2013, Haruna 2013, Ha 2013, Kömürcü Nobrega/Boucher 2013, Meshgena 2013, Neufeld 2013, shedistan 2013, Sula 2013, Sow 2013.

[4]    Greiner 2013, 13; for correction see „The N-word“ under 2.1.

[5]    Ibid.

[6]    Orwell 1949.

[7]    Wiedenroth-Coulibaly 2007, 410.

[8]    Oguntoye 2006.

[9]    Oguntoye 2006,18.

[10] McGrane 2013.

[11] Greiner 2013, 13.

[12] Hacke 2013.

[13] Ende 1960.

[14] Greiner 2013, 14.

[15] Greiner 2013, 13.

[16] Ayivi 2013.

[17] Hacke 2013.

[18] Fanon 2008, 15.

[19] Greiner 2013, 13.

[20] Arndt 2006, 7.

[21] Kilomba 2008, 43–45.

[22] See also Sow 2013.

[23] After Paul Gilroy „denial“ is one of the five steps a white person goes through in order to become aware of his / her own whiteness and his / her racism.

[24] Kilomba 2008, 16, 17.

[25] Bach u.a. 2013.

Advertisements

Ein Kommentar zu “The Debate about Racism within Children’s Books (2)

  1. Pingback: The Debate about Racism within Children’s Books (1) | Afrika Wissen Schaft

Kommentar verfassen

Trage deine Daten unten ein oder klicke ein Icon um dich einzuloggen:

WordPress.com-Logo

Du kommentierst mit Deinem WordPress.com-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Twitter-Bild

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Twitter-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Facebook-Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Facebook-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Google+ Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Google+-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Verbinde mit %s